“Land of Lava, Springs, Man-Eaters & Magical Sunsets”

From the sight of fifty million gallons of crystal clear water gushing out of from the under parched lava rock that is the Mzima Springs  to the Shetani  lava flows, Tsavo West is a beautiful, rugged wilderness. The savannah ecosystem comprises of open grasslands, scrublands, and Acacia woodlands, belts of riverine vegetation and rocky ridges including the Poacher’s Lookout where visitors can see the teeming herds in the plains below. Tsavo West offers some of the most magnificent game viewing in the world and attractions include elephant, rhino, Hippos, lions, cheetah, leopards, Buffalos, diverse plant and bird species including the threatened corncrake and near threatened Basra Reed Warbler.

How to get there

Distance: 240 km from Nairobi, 250km from Mombasa (Mtito Andei Gate).
By air: There are 3 airstrips in the park
Gates: Tsavo, Lake Jipe, Mtito Andei (Kamboyo HQ), Chyulu, Maktau and Ziwani.
Roads: The main access routes are through Chyulu Gate from Amboseli and Mtito Andei Gate from Nairobi.
Visitors from Mombasa also use Tsavo Gate near Manyani.
The Park can also be reached via Taveta – Voi road through Maktau, Ziwani and Jipe Gates.
Airstrips: Kamboyo, Kilaguni, Tsavo Gate, Jipe, Kasigau,Finch Hottons, Ziwani, and Maktau airstrips are in good.

Attractions
  • The spectacle Mzima Springs is the sight of fifty million gallons of crystal clear water gushing out of from the  under parched lava rocks, forming the most welcoming and lovely scene in Africa.
  • Ancient lands of Lions, in 1898 the Uganda railway construction was abruptly halted by the two of the most voracious and insatiable man-eating lions appeared upon the scene, and for over nine month waged intermittent warfare against the railway and all those connected with it in the vicinity of Tsavo.
  • A vibrant volcanic arena; molten lava that form Shetani lava spewed from the earth just about 200 years ago and its fiery fury was thought by locals to be work of the Devil.
  • Poacher’s Lookout and roaring rocks; the Park abound the panoramic vintage point from which to view the movement of the herds.
    Glorious game drives; Tsavo west offers some of the most magnificent game viewing in the world.
  • Ngulia Sanctuary; this is where the growing population of highly endangered black rhino are inching from chasm of extinction forced upon them by rampant poaching in the 1960s.
  • Lake Jipe, lies astride Kenya and Tanzania boarder and is teeming with aquatic life, Bird watching I also major activity around the lake.
  • First World War Site-East African Campaign, Perhaps the most bizarre campaign of the world war was fought in the “Bundu” (Bush) – the barely explored wilderness of thorny scrub and dense forest of Tsavo west. This last ‘gentleman war’ was waged under the code of honor-sometimes; or under guerilla tactics adopted from African tribal fighters. The Guided tours of the Crater, Kichwa Tembo and Mzima fort will enable you trail the real footsteps of the world war veterans.
Park Entry Fee

Tsavo West National Park

Citizen

Resident

Non-Resident

Adults

KSH

Child

KSH

Adults

KSH

Child

KSH

Adults

USD

Child

USD

515

215

1,030

515

52

35

Dhow and Boat Rides

Dhow and Boat Rides

The dhows

“Nawalilkher” and “Babulkher” are authentic ocean-worthy Jahazis (traditional Arab sailing boats), formerly used for cargo trading along the Kenyan coast and on to the Arab states. They have been refurbished as floating restaurants retaining all the traditional aspects of the original Dhow and Boat Rides. They are now moored at the Mombasa tamarind jetty.

“Nawalilkher” is available for individual bookings and has can seat 70 pax for dinner, leaving plenty of room for dancing on the night cruises. The dhow can also hold cocktail parties for up to 100 people.

“Babulkher” has a capacity of 55 pax for dinner and 70 pax for cocktails and is also available for exclusive hire.

The lunchtime cruise

Nawalilkher sails every day except Sunday for both the day and evening cruises. private charters can be organized for Sunday as required.

the lunchtime cruise departs from the tamarind jetty at.1.00 pm, cruises gently up the Tudor creek to a secluded spot where the dhow moors. lunch consists of a delicious tamarind seafood platter with a selection of Kenya’s wonderful seafood or a prime Kenyan fillet steak followed by fresh tropical fruit-salad, and rounded off with Kenyan coffee and halwa.  The dhow returns to the jetty at 3.00 p m.

The dinner cruises

The dinner cruise commencing at 6.30 pm, begins with a welcome “Dawa” cocktail as the dhow sails towards fort Jesus. The twinkling lights of Mombasa and the starlit skies provide idyllic surroundings for a delicious seafood dinner meticulously prepared in Swahili style on the deck in front of the guests. The resident Dj on board offers a wide choice of dance music, from the latest hits to the golden oldies as the dhow gently glides back to the tamarind jetty by 10.30 pm.

Boat Ride at Naivasha

Lake Naivasha National Park is a bird lover’s paradise and taking a boat ride can get you real close (as close as 5 meters) to these avian wonders — pigeons, flamingoes, crows, and even fish eagles. You can take a leisure boat ride, usually for about 90 minutes during which you get to witness dozens of hippos wallowing in water and the different species of birds on Crescent Island. This island was one of the settings for the 1985 movie “Out Of Africa” starring Meryl Streep. While here you can do a walking safari with a guide, see animals like zebra wildebeest, etc… relax and even do a picnic. At night, it’s not so safe as this is when hippos graze.

$ 2,160

Hiking

$ 2,160
$ 1,489

Kayaking

Kayaking is the use of a kayak for moving across water. It is distinguished from canoeing by the sitting position of the paddler and the number of blades on the paddle. A kayak is a low-to-the-water, canoe-like boat in which the paddler sits facing forward, legs in front, using a double-bladed paddle to pull front-to-back on one side and then the other in rotation. Most kayaks have closed decks, although sit-on-top and inflatable kayaks are growing in popularity as well.

Kayaks were created thousands of years ago by the Inuit, formerly known as Eskimos, of the northern Arctic regions. They used driftwood and sometimes the skeleton of whale, to construct the frame of the kayak, and animal skin, particularly seal skin was used to create the body. The main purpose for creating the kayak, which literally translates to “hunter’s boat” was for hunting and fishing. The kayak’s stealth capabilities, allowed for the hunter to sneak up behind animals on the shoreline, and successfully catch their prey. By the mid-1800s the kayak became increasingly popular and the Europeans became interested. German and French men began kayaking for sport. In 1931, a man named Adolf Anderle became the first person to kayak down the Salzachofen Gorge, this is where the birthplace of modern-day white-water kayaking is believed to have begun. Kayak races were introduced in the Berlin Olympic Games in 1936.

In the 1950s fiberglass kayaks were developed and commonly used, until 1980s when polyethylene plastic kayaks came about. Kayaking progressed as a fringe sport in the U.S. until the 1970s, when it became a mainstream popular sport. Now, more than 10 white water kayaking events are featured in the Olympics.While kayaking represents a key international watersport, few academic studies have been conducted on the role kayaking plays in the lives and activities of the public .

$ 1,552

Masai Village Visit

Masai Village Visit is a formidable activity to do while in Kenya.

You’ve seen pictures of them – adorned with the brilliant red, blue and purple patterns of the shukas they wear. The men with their spears, tall and proud. The women bejeweled with bright beaded earrings and scarves. These are the some of the oldest inhabitants of East Africa, the Maasai people.

They live in small mud-thatched villages, surrounded by their cattle and smaller livestock. For hundreds of years the Masai have roamed these lands of Kenya and Tanzania, living a free, nomadic lifestyle. Their traditional lands now comprise much of Kenya’s national parks.

A highlight of your safari vacation is a visit with these Maasai people. Many of the tribes welcome visitors to their villages to view up close their culture and lifestyle.

Arriving at the Village – An Explosion of Colour

The first thing you’ll notice as you enter a village is the many vivid colours of the Masai’s garments. The bright shukas or sheets they wear contrast strongly with the greens and browns of the landscape.

Adding to this display of colour is the brightly beaded jewelry – necklaces, bracelets and amulets – worn by the women and men.

This beadwork, while very appealing, has more than just an ornamental value. The women who create it express their identity and social status with these handcrafted pieces.

You’ll see displays of this beaded jewelry for sale, and you can help support the village with a purchase… as well as bringing home an authentic souvenir from your travels.

Music and Dance

You may get to experience the villagers singing and dancing… and you might even be able to join in! The Maasai are known for their rhythmic call-and-response singing. Perhaps their most widely known dance is the adumu or “jumping dance”.

The warriors form a circle with one person entering the center. This dancer will jump higher and higher to the rhythms of the singers. As he jumps higher the singers will raise the pitch of their voices.

Sometimes guests are invited into the circle, adding to the dancing fun!

The Boma

Standing in muted contrast to the colourful villagers, you’ll see the browns and grays of the Maasai’s houses, called bomas. Small structures with thatched roofs, it is the job of the Maasai women to build these sturdy dwellings.

The women begin with a framework of timber poles and interweave smaller branches to form a structure. This is then covered with a mixture of mud, grass, cow dung, urine and ash. The entire structure is no more than 3 x 5 m in area and stands only 1.5 m tall.

Yet the family cooks, eats, sleeps and socialises in this modest structure – even sharing space with small livestock! You may be able to peek inside to experience a very different lifestyle.

The men also participate in constructing this homestead. It is their responsibility to build the protective fencing around the village to keep lions and other predators away from the livestock.

We’ll Be Your Guide

We’ll provide you with opportunities to enjoy a visit to a Masai Village. On your Incredible Adventure to the Masai Mara Reserve or Amboseli National Park, you can partake of this optional excursion. The cost is only $20 and payable to the village chief. Just ask your driver/guide who will make all the arrangements.

Should you have any other special requests for your safari adventure please don’t hesitate to ask your guide or contact our offices. You can contact us online here.

$ 2,160

Night Game Drive

$ 1,489
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